Dog Obedience commands to use in the Garden

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By Laura Pakis, Certified Professional Trainer and Blogger

So you’re ready to garden.  You have the time, the weather is great and the ground is right for you to start working in.  There’s a glitch, your best furry friend wants to join you.  What dog obedience commands can you use in the garden to help make this a quality time for both of you?

Commands aren’t just tricks.  They can be used to stop a dog from digging.  They can keep a dog in one location while teaching self-control.  They become a form of communication between you and your dog being frustrated or enjoying time together.

Here’s some tips to help you and your furry friend have a great gardening season

  • Sit

    • What it means: Your dog sits and holds the sit until released. No sniffing, scratching, barking, whining, lying down, standing up, etc.
    • When to use it:
      • Wiping feet after being outside
      • For examinations (eyes, ears, nose, mouth, etc)
      • Greeting new people
      • During play (before playing fetch)
      • Putting on collars
      • When talking to friends or neighbors
      • At curbs and intersections
    • Why it is helpful: Keeps your dog from pulling on leash, jumping on people, helps build self-restraint

 

Down

  • What it means: Your dog lies down and holds the down until released. No sniffing, scratching, barking, whining, standing up, rolling over, creeping/crawling forward etc.
  • When to use it:
    • Keeps your dog in one location
    • When talking to friends or neighbors
  • Why it is helpful: Keeps your dog from pulling on leash, jumping on people, helps build self-restraint

 

  • Place Mat

    • What it means: Your dog goes to a place mat and stays there until released. All four feet must be on the mat, but the dog can sit, stand, lie down, play, eat, or sleep.  No barking, whining, leaving the mat.
    • When to use it:
      • Keeps your dog in one location but gives them freedom
      • When you are busy
      • As an alternative to the kennel/crate
    • Why it is helpful: Helps develop a great deal of self-restraint, allows dog to be near you without getting in the way while you are busy

 

  • Leave It

    • What it means: Used to keep your dog from approaching, eating, sniffing, licking, or grabbing any person, place, or thing (people, cats, dogs, food, decorations, rooms, etc)
    • When to use it:
      • With mulch eating
      • With plants you don’t want your dog to have
      • With other dogs or cats
      • With leaves, shoes, feces, socks, or any other object
      • Preventing the dog from entering flower beds or places
    • Why it is helpful: Can keep your dog safe, helps develop self-restraint, can help prevent a kitchen floor scavenger

 

  • Boundary training

    • What it means: Your dog stays within a designated area
    • When to use it:
      • To protect areas of your garden
      • To restrict your dog from leaving the yard
      • Preventing the dog from entering flower beds or places
    • Why it is helpful: Can keep your dog safe, helps develop self-restraint, can help prevent smashed plants

 

Eliminate on Command

  • What it means: Your dog will eliminate within a designated area
  • When to use it:
    • To protect areas of your garden
    • To restrict your dog to a specific elimination area
    • Prevent urine burn
  • Why it is helpful: Can keep your yard clean and nicer looking

 

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