How and Why with Giving Dog Supplements

You want the best for your dog, and you want them to live long, healthy lives, so do you give them dog supplements?

Most dog owners have heard of joint supplements, but there are a variety of vitamins, minerals, proteins, and oils that can be added to your dog’s diet to ‘supplement’ their meals.  There are times when supplements help and when too much of a good thing can cause many problems.  Always consult your veterinarian or a nutritionist before giving any supplement to your dog.

Are dog supplements safe to give?

According to Matt Brunke, DVM, CCRP, CVPP, CVA, dog supplements are considered nutraceuticals.  In laymen’s terms, nutraceuticals are not drugs but are considered food and regulated as such. And just because a nutraceutical label claims something doesn’t mean it’s the truth.  So, as dog owners, we need to be concerned with the supplement’s safety and effectiveness.

Several reputable manufacturers are happy to communicate with veterinarians and educate them to make informed decisions with dog owners.

Why would you need to give your dog a supplement?

Dogs need carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals to remain healthy. Often, reading your dog’s dog food label makes it much harder to know whether or not they’re getting everything they need, especially if all their food is in a bag of kibble.  Can you trust what’s inside those dry pellets?

It’s not an easy answer, and here is another reason why talking with your veterinarian is so important.

Most dogs don’t need supplements until they are much older, but some dogs may require supplements from an early age due to different genetics. There are two main reasons to use a dietary supplement for your dog:

  1. When your dog’s digestive tract is not absorbing enough nutrients and needs a supplement to provide it with the appropriate vitamins and minerals.
  2. When your dog’s diet is not providing them enough nutrients in the first place.

Do dog supplements work?

According to Dawn M. Boothe, DVM, MS, Ph.D., director of the clinical pharmacology lab at the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine, “It depends on what the supplement is used for and how it is manufactured.” Clinical trials are rare. “It’s hard finding quality evidence for the efficacy, much less the need for these products,” Boothe says.

How should a dog owner choose a supplement?

Acme Canine is sharing this list from WebMD Dog Vitamins and Supplements. Get the Facts.

  • Look for a brand that specializes in one area or that has commissioned clinical studies of its products.
  • Read labels. Know the name of the ingredient you’re looking for, so you won’t be deceived by sound-alikes.
  • Look for a lot number on the product, a sign that the company has set up quality control checks.
  • Look for a contact number for the company on the label. Call and ask who formulated the product, what expertise they have, and how long the manufacturer has been in business.
  • Be wary of claims that sound too good to be true, such as promises to alleviate diseases like parvovirus, cancer, and hip dysplasia.
  • Look for certification from an organization that has independently verified a supplement’s contents.
  • Be cautious about giving human supplements to dogs. Some products, such as garlic, can be dangerous for dogs.
  • Know the seller. ConsumerLab.com has found fewer problems with supplements sold at vet’s offices.

Finn Dog Supplements

 

Finn asked Acme Canine to test and review its dog supplements.  We received the multivitamin, digestive probiotics, and calming aid supplements.  Each comes in a resealable metal can, which stopped our dog, Penny, from eating three entire cans of supplements!

For a dog Penny’s size (60 lbs), the daily amount for each type of supplement is three chews or about two months of supplements per can. Each can contains 90 soft chews or approximately 7.9 oz. At $28.00/can, you end up paying about $0.16/chew.  Not bad for the number of quality ingredients in the products.

What we learned

The Finn company puts extra care into the formulation of its products.  They only use scientifically backed and thoroughly vetted ingredients to help proactively care for pets. They also partner with vets and pet care providers to ensure everything they do is approved.

They have a lot number on the bottom of each can and a contact number for the company on the label.

Finn manufactures their soft chews in a US-based, current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facility that is FDA-registered and certified with the National Animal Supplements Council (NASC).  And they find the best manufacturing partners, source the highest quality ingredients, and partner with suppliers who live up to their standards of testing, safety, and quality.

Finn puts sustainability and wellness are at the heart of what they do. They believe in good health for humans, animals, and the planet. They package their soft chews in recyclable sources. Their tins are made with 100% recycled steel and can be recycled. You can also recycle their cardboard packages to minimize the environmental footprint further.

And they give back to our community by partnering with local animal shelters and donating a portion of their proceeds to help rescue efforts. They also give shelters lots of Finn supplements to help keep the dogs in their care healthy.

How Penny liked the supplements

A picture says a 1,000 words, so this photo truly shows you how delicious Penny thinks the supplements are.

Final Thoughts

If you’re looking for a quality vet-approved supplement for your dog, be sure to talk with your veterinarian about Finn.

Acme Canine gives them 4 paws up for company integrity, quality ingredients, community involvement, and the company’s interest in sustainability.

Let’s talk dogs, or even better, let’s learn about dogs.  Gain more canine knowledge through Acme Canine’s social media:  websiteFacebookYouTubeInstagram
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